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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
and russian foreign ministers met with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before pa
with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before panetta made his remarks to the i
of the stability of syria's government came today from a russian diplomat and a nato official, saying the assad regime may be near collapse. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we interview russia's ambassador to the united nations, vitaly churkin about syria and about u.s. ambassador susan rice's decision to take her name out of consideration to be secretary of state. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the fiscal crisis here at home. andrew kohut explains the latest poll numbers, showing strong support for the way president obama is handling the negotiations. >> the democrats are better regarded in this negotiation than the republicans by a lot. >> warner: plus ray >> warner: plus, ray suarez gets two views on proposals to raise the age of eligibility for medicare to 67, from 65. >> woodruff: it's bottoms up tonight for miles o'brien who reports on genetic links to alcoholism and other addictions. >> so far as i know, there's no law against reporting under the influence, so here goes something. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc g
" tonight, we interview russia's ambassador to the united nations, vitaly churkin about syria and about u.s. ambassador susan rice's decision to take her name out of consideration to be secretary of state. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the fiscal crisis here at home. andrew kohut explains the latest poll numbers, showing strong support for the way president obama is handling the negotiations. >> warner: plus, ray suarez gets two views on proposals to raise the age of eligibility for medicare to 67, from 65. >> woodruff: it's bottoms up tonight for miles o'brien who reports on genetic links to alcoholism and other addictions. >> so far as i know, there's no law against reporting under the influence, so here goes something. while i may carry the genes of an irish pub crawler, my chances of becoming an alcoholic are slightly less. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc grossman about prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major fundi
continued across syria today as the united states welcomed a russian admission that syria's rebels may succeed in overthrowing president bashar al-assad. we may have a problem with that tape and we apologize. we'll try and get it together. if we're not able to -- we're going to go ahead and interview right now mr. vitaly churkin. he is russia's ambassador to the united nations. thank you for joining us. let me begin by asking you about the comment today made by your deputy foreign minister mr. bog don november. he said today "it is impossible to exclude a victory of the syrian opposition." how would you describe the situation in syria? >> well, you know i think he went on saying that the syrian government seems to be losing ground in the fighting with the opposition and i think this is obvious. but i don't think there is anything in that statement which one can welcome or not welcome. first of all, that doesn't mean that the trouble will end any time soon. the fighting may continue for a very long time still and the battle may keep going this way or the other way for a long time becaus
the opportunity to diverse, talk about afghanistan, bahrain, syria, talk about this, that, and so the agenda has to be narrow as a need of focusing on the issue of the principle concern. that's one. that's con accept issue, as far as i can tell was never resolved. when an issue remains unresolved, the status quo revails. i suspect, given the fact the issue of a bilateral conversation is a last ditch effort, likely to remain focused. should it be considered a last ditch effort? i don't think so. you talk about years of decision, the year of that, the year of that. we have more time on this issue. it's a paradoxical one. think about it as not having the time, yet, there's always more time. you know, everybody, so this is in 2008, 2009, somehow this issue seems to have within its urgency a degree of time flexibility. i don't know how to explain that. we have had bilateral discussions before in october 2009, most collectly. if there's a bilateral one to take place, which tends to condition the agenda that's going to be discussed. >> marina, bringing you in on this, ray said we need a sense of modest
's going on right now. syria is running out of friends. the government of assad two years deep into war with its own people never had many allies to begin with. today russia's support of syria is cracking. for the first time a senior russian official has says publicly syria could likely fall to the rebels. the deputy foreign minister in moscow said we need to look at the facts in the eye. we can't exclude a victory by the opposition. the russians have blocked all u.n. security council resolutions aimed at stopping the civil war in syria. they have vetoed sanctions against the assad regime and provided weapons to government troops fighting the rebels. now their most powerful ally says assad might be losing. they're not alone. head of nato today said this. irng the regime in damascus is approaching collapse. i think now it is only a question of time. but those people, they're the politicians, want to see the real side of syria's civil war, the streets where people are caught up in the crossfire dying there. what you're about to say you can only see here on cnn. this is a teenager risking
syria, secretary panetta said later. he said he invited kim jong-un for dinner, he served him a glass of wine and tried to find out how he thinks. he is clearly a complex man. his accomplishments over 74 years span two branches of government, education, and a little bit of farm labor on his california ranch. before taking office as the 23rd secretary of defense, secretary panetta served more than two years as cia director. after three years, chief of staff to president clinton. he and his wife cut directed the leon and sylvia and the institute at cal state university at monterey bay. to promote public service. he served eight terms in congress. rising to chairman of the house budget committee in 1989. then president clinton's director of the office of management and budget to replaced by me in welcoming to the national press club secretary defense leon panetta. [applause] >> thank you very much, theresa, for that kind introduction. thank you for the introduction to be here today. i look forward to the opportunity to go back and pick walnuts back in california. told this story before b
you. saturday night at 10:00 p.m. eastern on c-span2 p. >>> leon panetta on the syria government response against the rebel. the remarking game at the joint briefing with the veteran affair secretary eric shinseki on efforts to assist military personnel reentering life. if no agreement is reached on the fiscal cliff. this twenty five minute event took police at the veteran affair offices in washington, d.c. >>> thank you, tommy. first, let me thank secretary panetta for the unwavering support for the here at the va and the men and women who wear and have worn the uniform of the nation. our close partnership with the immediating we had -- meeting we had today on their behalf has never been more important as it is today. as we enter the holiday season i want to thank the men and whoim spend their holiday away from the families defending the nation. we're grateful for their the service and sacrifice. as we have discussed very little what we do here at va -- most of what we work on originated in dodd and that's why achieving our priorities at va requires the close and collaborative w
between 1979 and his death in 2006. >>> we want to turn to the crisis in syria, where government officials have rejected a decision by the u.s. to recognize the opposition as representative of the syrian people. it comes as u.s. officials say forces loyal to president bashar al assad have fired at least four short range scud missiles into northern syria, likely at rebels. those missiles are adding to fears that syria could be developing chemical weapons. in an exclusive interview with erin burnett, defense secretary leon pa net ta talked about the potential threat. >> i think there's a danger here. based on the intelligence that we got a few weeks ago that they were in fact beginning to assemble these weapons and put them together, and when you do that, that's the dangerous sign that the next step is to use them. and so that's why we issued the warnings we did, made very clear there would be consequences and at least you know, at least at point, the intelligence on this issue is kind of leveled off. but my concern is this, that as the opposition continues to move against the regime, partic
for aircraft missiles to go to turkey. four will accompany to defend against rocketh atangs against syria. and for the first time he spoke about intelligence that led to concerns that the assad regime was considering using chemical forces. panetta said there were clear indications that they were assembling weapons for using deadly sarin gas. >> panetta said the intelligence leveled off and there are no new indications that assad is planning to take the next step. >>> tomorrow the egyptians will begin voting on a new constitution. last night in cairo supporters and opponents of morsi fought in the streets. the new constitution was written by morsi's islamist supporters. it will divide the nation, but the measure is expected to pass. >>> back in this country southern california's in store for another day of high tides and flooding. the so-called king tides are the highest tides of the year formed by the alignment of the sun, moon, and architect. low-lying communities along the pacific coast highway were flooded. in some areas the tide reached seven feet. >>> we'll take a quick break on a fr
in the middle east if you look at syria where the u.s. is at risk for being drawn into a serious conflict there, and weapons, there's obviously talk about iran as well. is the shift occurring before the job is done? >> well, i would go back to the presidency strategy on this, and take a look at it. didn't say that we would only, we reject everything we have in the military, across our government into the asia pacific. and prioritize the asia-pacific but also talked about the enduring requirement for us to be present and any security role in the middle east as well. so, you know, we're talking about i think a near-term perspective on this. you know, we see a kaleidoscope in afghanistan. yes, the middle east has issues and has historically had issues that will require i think u.s., obviously he was leadership and also will require certain level of military security overtime. and we will have to balance that as we look at the size and nature of our force structure. and what we have, the assets we have to be able to accomplish it, but i'm convinced that we can do both in the long run. and i'm convi
between instability and central africa and the global terrorist threat. but from afghanistan to syria to iran to north korea, we also must recognize the existence of demonstrate actors and regimes that directly threaten the united states and our allies. therefore, we must ensure that the our military is sufficiently resourced and national leaders prioritize our defense resources toward efforts that are appropriate for the u.s. military and our national vital security interest. i look forward to learning more about the situation on the ground as well as what the u.s. government is doing to address the situation in the drc. mr. smith? >> thank you, mr. chairman. i thank you very much for taking the time to hold the hearing. it's a very important issue, as you can described the situation in the eastern drc is dire. it's largest humanitarian crisis i think too few people have heard of. and some estimate of the war going over the course of the last fifteen to twenty years. and nearly 5 million people have been killed. many more wounded, injured, raped. it's a place are a lot of people are
of the humanitarian crisis unfolding in syria. lisa sylvester is monitoring that and other stories here in the situation room. what is going on? >> a quarter of the population in syria is in need of food, shelter, medical area or other aid. the situation is, quote, dramatically deteriorating. the u.n. says half a million syrians have fled the civil war and barbara mikulski will become the chair of the senate appropriations committee: mikulski would be the first female to chair that powerful committee. >>> and we have new information on this video. take a look here. this has been causing quite the sensation on the internet. it purports to show a child being taken by an eagle but it t is a hoax. it hasn't stopped it from getting more than a million hits in youtube since being posted last night. and the photo sharing app instagram is backtracking by suggesting it owns photos and can use them without providing compensation. the co-founder says that the language is being removed in the user language. and talk about an uproar, i know a lot of people were buzzing about that saying, wait a minu
at syria where u.s. is at risk, a serious conflict there with the chemical weapons, obviously, real concerns about iran as well. is the shift occurring before the job is done in the middle east? >> well, i would go back to the president's strategy on this, and take a look at it that didn't say we'd shift everything we have in the military or in the government into the asia pacific. it prioritized the asia pacific, but it talked about an enduring requirement to be in a present and security role in the middle east as well. you know, we're talking about, i think, a near term perspective on this, you know, we're -- we seed a glide slope in afghanistan. yes, the middle east is -- has issues that and has historically had issues that will require, i think, u.s., obviously, u.s. leadership, but also requires certain level of military security over time, and we will have to balance that as we look at the size and nature of our forestructure, and, you know, what we have, the assets we have to be able to accomplish it, but i'm convinced we can do both in the long run, and i'm convinced we're o
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)